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By Alexandra Kilpatrick
July 24, 2014
Caption : Dismayed at the Supreme Court’s decision in the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby case June 30, women’s health advocates took comfort in Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s dissent. Only four hours after her dissent was issued, songwriter Jonathan Mann turned her sharply worded decision into a song set to a guitar strum.     

Dismayed by the Supreme Court’s decision in the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby case earlier this summer, women’s health advocates took comfort in Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s dissent. Only four hours after her dissent was issued, songwriter Jonathan Mann turned her sharply worded decision into a song set to a guitar strum.

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court allowed closely held for-profit corporations to be exempt from any law its owners religiously object to if there is a less restrictive way to further the law’s interest. An interpretation of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, the decision did not address whether these corporations are protected by the First Amendment’s free-exercise of religion clause.

Ginsburg issued a blistering dissent in the Supreme Court case: “The distinction between a community made up of believers in the same religion and one embracing persons of diverse beliefs, clear as it is, constantly escapes the Court’s attention.”

Although Mann could have taken a few months to reflect on the landmark Supreme Court case, his song, while goofy, emoted the intense energy surrounding the freshly made decision. The YouTube star had been writing a song a day for nearly 2,000 days.

With phrases like “slut-shaming geezers,” Mann certainly claimed some artistic license and infused his own spin to broaden the song’s appeal to a wider audience.

Check out the video below:

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