By C, and ice Bernd
May 14, 2013
Caption : Two tech leaders left Mark Zuckerberg’s new group in protest of the organization’s ads supporting the Keystone XL pipeline and drilling in the Arctic.     

Mark Zuckerberg's friends are 'unfriending' him. Apparently, they don't want to see ads for Keystone XL and Arctic drilling in their feed.

After Mark Zuckerberg was trolled on Facebook and other social media networking sites for bankrolling support of the Keystone XL pipeline and drilling in the Arctic National Refuge, his new political group, FWD.us, is losing some major supporters.

Two tech leaders, CEO of Tesla Motors Elon Musk and Yammer Founder David Sacks, resigned in protest over the ads. According to ThinkProgress, the tech leaders were listed as major contributors on an older version the website for FWD.us.

But both names has since been taken down from the site.

According to AllThingsD Musk said:

I agreed to support FWD, because there is a genuine need to reform immigration. However, this should not be done at the expense of other important causes. I have spent a lot of time fighting far larger lobbying organizations in DC and believe that the right way to win on a cause is to argue the merits of that cause.

FWD.us is primarily focused on passing the comprehensive immigration reform bill and has called the ads a way to build support for immigration reform from Republican legislators.

The subsidiary group responsible for the dirty energy ads is called Americans for a Conservative Direction and the ad in question originally supported Sen. Lindsay Graham (R-SC) for advocating for the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline and expanded drilling in the Arctic.

CREDO posted a counter-ad on Facebook with Zuckerberg's photo asking him to pull his support for Keystone XL, but Facebook rejected the ad.

Since the backlash, a coalition of liberal groups announced they will suspend advertising on Facebook.

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